In The Press

TechCrunch: Dropbox snares HelloSign

Alan Pelz-Sharpe, founder and principal analyst at Deep Analysis, who has been following this market for many years, says the fact it’s an Extensions partner should allow much faster integration than would happen normally in an acquisition like this. “Simple document processes that relate to small and medium business are still largely manual. The fact that HelloSign  has solutions for things like real estate, insurance and customer/employee on boarding, plus the existing extension to Dropbox, means it can be leveraged quickly for revenue growth by Dropbox, Pelz-Sharpe explained.

Document Strategy: Here’s why you need explainable AI

Transparency is an important topic for any company looking to implement or use artificial intelligence (AI) systems. This is because some AI systems are essentially black boxes—you have no idea how they came to a decision—while others are more transparent and explainable. Many enterprise buyers want a reasonable level of transparency in their AI systems, but most AI developers only pay lip service to this requirement.

AIIM: Fact or Fiction: The 3 Biggest Misconceptions About Artificial Intelligence

As you may know, AIIM recently launched a new training course titled Practical AI for the Information Professional. The challenge presented to my colleague Kashyap and I was to take a very complex and hyped topic and make it understandable and relevant to the real world needs of the business — cutting through the hype, demystifying the technology and providing sound advice and guidance.

Digitizing Polaris: DocuSign acquired SpringCM

He makes a good argument and SpringCM makes for a good buy for DocuSign, according to industry analyst Alan Pelz-Sharpe of Deep Analysis. “SpringCM pivoted a few years ago to focus on contract management and so digital signatures are an integral part of any delivered system. They were also arguably the first SaaS ECM system but were ahead of there time so the match up with DocuSign makes good sense.”

TechCrunch: Google One is more proof of commoditization of consumer cloud storage

Alan Pelz-Sharpe, principal analyst at Deep Analysis, who has been watching this space for years says that consumer cloud storage pricing has always been a race to the bottom. “You can only make a margin with mass scale. That’s why firms who are not Microsoft, Amazon or Google are pushing hard for business and enterprise customers. Google One just brings that message home,” he said. If you get enough scale, as Dropbox has with an estimated 500 million users, if you can get a percentage to pay $8.25 a month for a terabyte of storage, it can add up to real money. When Dropbox filed its S-1 to before it went public earlier this year, it reported more than $1 billion in consumer revenue. It would be difficult if not impossible for a startup launching today to compete with the existing players, but the ones out there continue to compete with one another, driving the cost down even further.

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